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with the support of

 Green Music Seminar and Workshop, Kaustinen, Finland  |   Urban Music Workshop  |   Discovery and Exchange Sessions  | 

Introduction

 

Presentation of the IYMF – F.Chabaud

Presentation of the ExTra! Exchange Traditions Project and the European Music Council – Simone Dudt

 

Presentation and performance of Kaustinen traditional music with Mauno Järvelä and young Finnish musicians

 

Mauno Järvelä, self-learned fiddle player, explains that traditional music is now being taught in Finnish music schools, which was not the case some decades ago. This results in a bigger amount of young traditional musicians (every child in Kaustinen plays an instrument, most of them performing traditional music).

 

The fiddle is one of the most appreciated traditional instrument in the Kaustinen region. It appeared at the XIXth century. The Finnish harmonium was first used for church services and was gradually taken out of the church for the use of traditional music.

 

A traditional Finnish waltz

 





Workshop I : Introduction to the yoik, participants presentation

Annukka Hirvasvuopio-Laiti introduces the participants to the Sámi culture and to one of its musical traditions: the yoïk. Annukka is a yoïk performer and teacher of this very special singing technique and repertoire.

The Sámi are a minority living in the North (Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia). This minority has been persecuted for a long time, the shame of being a member of this community only really disappeared some 50 years ago. During this period, the yoïk was considered as a sin – this thought has not disappeared completely yet.

 

Some traditional sámi instruments accompanying the yoïk

 

 

The yoïk is almost always dedicated to a person. The singer doesn’t sing a yoïk for someone, but Sámi say that he or she “is yoïking” this person. The piece of music creates a virtual link between the singer and its “dedicator”. Though, a person has to know very well a person before being able to create a yoïk for him or for her.

An example of yoïk by Annukka Hirvasvuopio-Laiti (in construction)

Workshop II : In the nature with Juhana Nyrhinen, building green instruments

Juhana lives near Tampere and is part of a project called Uulu (www.uulu.fi) dealing with green instruments. 

 

He explains to the participants how to build instruments using soft woods and pieces of bark. These instruments can be use as decoy-bird.




European Music Council (EMC)